Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Back to school?

Yes, I know, school is already well under way. The kids have already been in school for over two months {boy, did that go fast}. Caleb is even doing a little bit of "school" this year. I am working with him on his letters - recognition, sounds, and writing. It has really helped to make him not feel left out while his older brothers and sister are in school.
Ron also has been teaching his English classes for about a month. So, you are probably wondering why I am writing a BACK TO SCHOOL post in October. Well, I am also back in school - but not full-time. A few weeks ago Ron found out about a Russian class that was being offered. In April of 2003 when we first went to Krasnoyarsk, Russia, I took private lessons {part-time} for about 6 months. Other than that "official" education, I only know what I have picked up over the years. I know enough to get around, but I sure would like to be fluent in the Russian language. Understanding someone else speak is much easier than actually speaking myself. So, this class seemed like a good oportunity to better my Russian. This past Monday eveing was my first chance to attend the class. I was so excited, yet nervous at the same time.



The lesson went well. The teacher was awesome. She was very friendly, energetic, and had lots of class participation. One little problem....actually this could be a HUGE problem.
All the other students in the class are Estonians who want/need to learn Russian. This means that the class is a mixture of Estonian and Russian. I think I only know one word in Estonia. So when the teacher {who speaks Estonian, Russian, and German - no English} teaches and explains words, meanings, and such, that is all in Estonian. Several of the other students know some English, but since I just met them, I'm not sure how much they know or how well they speak. The good news is that I made it through the class Monday night and was able to keep up with what was going on. The teacher talked to me after the class and asked me to come back. She said she would have the other students who speak English help me out some as I need it. I look forward to next Monday night. It may take several classes to see if this class will work out for me.
Another tool I am using to help me with my Russian is Rosetta Stone.


My goal is to be more diligent to use this program daily. I can use this program at my own convenience. I just need to discipline myself to use it faithfully. I sure would appreciate your prayers as I spend some extra time focusing on the Russian language. If the class doesn't work out, I am hoping the Lord will open another door for me.

8 comments:

  1. I am sure this is a challenge. I'm proud of you for taking it on. If you can hang in there and accomplish this, it will not only greatly aid you in your ministry, but it will be a wonderful challenge to your kids. They will respect you for it.

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  2. Rachel you describe how it was when I was in Tijuana. I'll be praying you can get more opportunities to use what you know and can benefit from the class. Rosetta Stone helped me too-I just needed a grammar book also. Praying for you!

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  3. I'll be praying for you! I want to get Rosetta to start learning Spanish.

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  4. Praying for you. Know how hard it can be to keep up with everything, especially being a mom. I'm hoping to start back up my russian lessons here soon... except it will be at home. Anxious to get started as I feel like I've slowly gone backwards in the language. Eric speaks fluently and even prays in the language. I'll have to pull out our rosetta stone again. Thanks for reminding me. :)

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  5. I'll be praying for you! I feel the same way, I can get around, but I'm not fluent. Here any language class is always taught in Danish or Greenlandic (no English), my husband jokes that you get "two for the price of one" but it can be difficult sometimes!

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  6. I'll be praying for you! I feel the same way, I can get around, but I'm not fluent. Here any language class is always taught in Danish or Greenlandic (no English), my husband jokes that you get "two for the price of one" but it can be difficult sometimes!

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  7. Hope your lessons work out for you, Rachel! Our classes were set up the same way. All of the students were foreigners (Chinese, Turkish, Thailand, etc...) and we were the only ones who spoke English. David says this was the best way, but I still think I might have caught on faster if someone had been able to explain the concepts to me. So, keep it up, dearie!

    I know that most people in America just assume that missionaries learn the language in the first year and never have to look back. If they only knew what a struggle it can be, especially for those of us with children!

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  8. We have considered Rosetta Stone for our family to learn Spanish. What to you think of it? It is profitable?

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An encouraging word is always welcome and much appreciated!

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